Open for Business: Infinium Studios – Springfield Business Journal

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Springfield, MO
Infinium Studios
A first-time business owner made a career pivot with the July 1 opening of Infinium Studios LLC. Stephan Sandor owns the tattoo and body piercing shop at Battlefield Mall with business partner Nick Kennedy. Sandor said startup costs were roughly $50,000 for the venture near the north entrance of JCPenney, 2825 S. Glenstone Ave. He declined to disclose the terms of his lease with mall owner Simon Property Group Inc. Sandor said four tattooists and a body piercer comprise the staff for the 900-square-foot shop, which charges a $100 minimum rate for the permanent body art. Sandor said he decided to pursue his dream of opening a tattoo shop following a 2018 cancer diagnosis. He noted he underwent five surgeries and chemotherapy treatment. He previously worked for insurance company Aflac Inc. and manufacturer Aire-Master of America Inc., and said Kennedy maintains his job as a pharmacist with Walgreens.
Hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday and Saturday
Phone: 417-771-5798
Web: InfiniumStudios.biz
Beauty Bar Hair Salon
Hairstylist Beth Edwards opened Beauty Bar Hair Salon LLC in her hometown of Strafford at 105 E. Pine St., Ste. B. Beauty Bar’s June 8 opening is the second venture for Edwards, who previously ran Allure Salon LLC for eight years in Springfield. She sold Allure last year for an undisclosed price to Cory Drake and Chrissy George, who renamed the salon Studio 2. Edwards, who has 10 years of experience in the hairdressing industry, said she wanted to downsize from her Springfield business amid the coronavirus pandemic. She purchased a lot on Pine Street, where a three-suite building was constructed for her by Keltner’s Construction & Excavation LLC. Each suite is 965 square feet, and Edwards said she is the building’s first occupant, but she declined to disclose startup costs. Edwards is currently the lone employee at the salon, which offers haircuts for men, women and children, ranging $10-$35. Other services include coloring, waxing and permanents. Hours: By appointment
Phone: 417-848-1348
Website: Facebook.com/BeautyBar417
The Victim Center
After 17 years at 819 Boonville Ave., The Victim Center Inc. moved June 15 to 815 W. Tampa St. Executive Director Brandi Bartel said the nonprofit, which was established in 1976, met its fundraising goal of $1.3 million for its new headquarters. The 9,000-square-foot facility is dubbed the O’Reilly Family and O’Reilly Auto Parts Building of Hope, following major donations from the auto parts retailer and its family owners. The Victim Center bought the property for $675,000 last year from Volt Credit Union, which moved its branch in February to 2440 N. Kansas Expressway, according to past reporting. Bartel said the 23-employee nonprofit, which serves adult and child survivors of violent or sexual crimes, spent roughly $380,000 in renovations. Its annual budget is nearly $1.2 million. She said the move was necessary as the agency ran out of room in its Boonville building and noted square footage has increased by about 50%.
Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Thursday
Phone: 417-863-7273 and 417-864-7233 (24-hour hotline)
Web: TheVictimCenter.org
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2101 W. Chesterfield Blvd., Ste. B105
Springfield, MO 65807

Phone: (417) 831-3238
Fax: (417) 864-4901
Email: sbj@sbj.net
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